Let’s put an END to VIOLENCE & ABUSE WORLDWIDE!

A 501c3 Organization

UPLIFTING HEARTS, MINDS & SOULS (HUMS)

RAINN INFORMATION:


Sexual assault can take many different forms, but one thing remains the same: it’s never the victim’s fault.

What is sexual assault? 


Sexual assault is a crime of power and control. The term sexual assault refers to sexual contact or behavior that occurs without explicit consent of the victim. Some forms of sexual assault include:

Penetration of the victim’s body, also known as rape
Attempted rape
Forcing a victim to perform sexual acts, such as oral sex or penetrating the perpetrator’s body
Fondling or unwanted sexual touching

What is rape? 


Rape is a form of sexual assault, but not all sexual assault is rape. The term rape is often used as a legal definition to specifically include sexual penetration without consent. For its Uniform Crime Reports, the FBI defines rape as “penetration, no matter how slight, of the vagina or anus with any body part or object, or oral penetration by a sex organ of another person, without the consent of the victim.” To see how your state legally defines rape and other forms of sexual assault, visit RAINN's State Law Database.

What is force? 
Force doesn’t always refer to physical pressure. Perpetrators may use emotional coercion, psychological force, or manipulation to coerce a victim into non-consensual sex. Some perpetrators will use threats to force a victim to comply, such as threatening to hurt the victim or their family or other intimidation tactics.

Who are the perpetrators?
The majority of perpetrators are someone known to the victim. Approximately 4 out of 5 of sexual assaults are committed by someone known to the victim, such as in the case ofintimate partner sexual violence or acquaintance rape.

The term “date rape” is sometimes used to to refer to acquaintance rape. Perpetrators of acquaintance rape might be a date, but they could also be a classmate, a neighbor, a friend’s significant other, or any number of different roles. It’s important to remember that dating, instances of past intimacy, or other acts like kissing do not give someone consent for increased or continued sexual contact.

In other instances the victim may not know the perpetrator at all. This type of sexual violence is sometimes referred to as stranger rape. Stranger rape can occur in several different ways:

Blitz sexual assault: when a perpetrator quickly and brutally assaults the victim with no prior contact, usually at night in a public place


Home invasion sexual assault: when a stranger breaks into the victim's home to commit the assault


Contact sexual assault: when a perpetrator contacts the victim and tries to gain their trust by flirting, luring the victim to their car, or otherwise trying to coerce the victim into a situation where the sexual assault will occur

Survivors of both stranger rape and acquaintance rape often blame themselves for behaving in a way that encouraged the perpetrator. It’s important to remember that the victim is a never to blame for the actions of a perpetrator.

OFFICE ON WOMEN'S HEALTH IN THE 

DEPARTMENT 0F HEALTH AND HUMAN 

SERVICES INFORMATION:

 
What is sexual assault?

​Sexual assault and abuse is any type of sexual activity that you do not agree to, including:

inappropriate touching
vaginal, anal, or oral penetration
sexual intercourse that you say no to
rape
attempted rape
child molestation

Sexual assault can be verbal, visual, or anything that forces a person to join in unwanted sexual contact or attention. Examples of this are voyeurism (when someone watches private sexual acts), exhibitionism (when someone exposes him/herself in public), incest (sexual contact between family members), and sexual harassment. It can happen in different situations, by a stranger in an isolated place, on a date, or in the home by someone you know.

Rape is a common form of sexual assault. It is committed in many situations — on a date, by a friend or an acquaintance, or when you think you are alone. Educate yourself on “date rape” drugs. They can be slipped into a drink when a victim is not looking. Never leave your drink unattended — no matter where you are. Try to always be aware of your surroundings. Date rape drugs make a person unable to resist assault and can cause memory loss so the victim doesn’t know what happened.

What do I do if I’ve been sexually assaulted?

Take steps right away if you’ve been sexually assaulted.

Get away from the attacker to a safe place as fast as you can. Then call 911 or the police.
Call a friend or family member you trust. You also can call a crisis center or a hotline to talk with a counselor. One hotline is the National Sexual Assault Hotline at 800-656-HOPE (4673). Feelings of shame, guilt, fear, and shock are normal. It is important to get counseling from a trusted professional.
Do not wash, comb, or clean any part of your body. Do not change clothes if possible, so the hospital staff can collect evidence. Do not touch or change anything at the scene of the assault.
Go to your nearest hospital emergency room as soon as possible. You need to be examined, treated for any injuries, and screened for possible sexually transmitted diseases (STDs) or pregnancy. The doctor will collect evidence using a rape kit for fibers, hairs, saliva, semen, or clothing that the attacker may have left behind.
You or the hospital staff can call the police from the emergency room to file a report.
Ask the hospital staff about possible support groups you can attend right away.

Where else can I go for help?

If you are sexually assaulted, it is not your fault. Don’t be afraid to ask for help or support. Help is available. You can call these organizations:

National Domestic Violence Hotline 1-800-799-SAFE (7233) or 1-800-787-3224 (TDD)
National Sexual Assault Hotline 1-800-656-HOPE (4673)

There are many organizations and hotlines in every state and territory. These crisis centers and agencies work hard to stop assaults and help victims. You can find contact information for these organizations at


http://www.womenshealth.gov/violence/state/.


You also can obtain the numbers of shelters, counseling services, and legal assistance in your phone book.

How can I protect myself from being sexually assaulted?

There are things you can do to reduce your chances of being sexually assaulted. Follow these tips from the National Crime Prevention Council.

Be aware of your surroundings — who’s out there and what’s going on.
Walk with confidence. The more confident you look, the stronger you appear.
Don’t let drugs or alcohol cloud your judgment.
Be assertive — don’t let anyone violate your space.
Trust your instincts. If you feel uncomfortable in your surroundings, leave.
Don’t prop open self-locking doors.
Lock your door and your windows, even if you leave for just a few minutes.
Watch your keys. Don’t lend them. Don’t leave them. Don’t lose them. And don’t put your name and address on the key ring.
Watch out for unwanted visitors. Know who’s on the other side of the door before you open it.
Be wary of isolated spots, like underground garages, offices after business hours, and apartment laundry rooms.
Avoid walking or jogging alone, especially at night. Vary your route. Stay in well-traveled, well-lit areas.
Have your key ready to use before you reach the door — home, car, or work.
Park in well-lit areas and lock the car, even if you’ll only be gone a few minutes.
Drive on well-traveled streets, with doors and windows locked.
Never hitchhike or pick up a hitchhiker.
Keep your car in good shape with plenty of gas in the tank.
In case of car trouble, call for help on your cellular phone. If you don’t have a phone, put the hood up, lock the doors, and put a banner in the rear mirror that says, “Help. Call police.”

How can I help someone who has been sexually assaulted?

You can help someone who is abused or who has been assaulted by listening and offering comfort. Go with her or him to the police, the hospital, or to counseling. Reinforce the message that she or he is not at fault and that it is natural to feel angry and ashamed.

More Information . . .

For more information on sexual assault, contact the National Women’s Health Information Center at 800-994-9662 or the following organizations:

Division of Violence Prevention, NCIPC, CDC, HHS
Phone: (770) 488-4362
Internet Address: http://www.cdc.gov/ncipc/dvp/dvp.htm

Office on Violence Against Women, OJP, DOJ
Phone: (800) 799-7233
Internet Address: http://www.ojp.usdoj.gov/vawo

National Center for Victims of Crime
Phone: (800) 394-2255
Internet Address: http://www.ncvc.org

National Crime Prevention Council
Phone: (202) 466-6272
Internet Address: http://www.ncpc.org

National Domestic Violence Hotline
Phone: (800) 799-SAFE
Internet Address: http://www.ndvh.org

National Sexual Violence Resource Center
Phone: (877) 739-3895
Internet Address: http://www.nsvrc.org

Rape, Abuse, and Incest National Network
Phone: (202) 544-1034
Internet Address: http://www.rainn.org

What are date rape drugs?

These are drugs that are sometimes used to assist a sexual assault. Sexual assault is any type of sexual activity that a person does not agree to. It can include touching that is not okay; putting something into the vagina; sexual intercourse; rape; and attempted rape. These drugs are powerful and dangerous. They can be slipped into your drink when you are not looking. The drugs often have no color, smell, or taste, so you can't tell if you are being drugged. The drugs can make you become weak and confused — or even pass out — so that you are unable to refuse sex or defend yourself. If you are drugged, you might not remember what happened while you were drugged. Date rape drugs are used on both females and males.

The three most common date rape drugs are:

Rohypnol (roh-HIP-nol). Rohypnol is the trade name for flunitrazepam (FLOO-neye-TRAZ-uh-pam). Abuse of two similar drugs appears to have replaced Rohypnol abuse in some parts of the United States. These are: clonazepam (marketed as Klonopin in the U.S.and Rivotril in Mexico) and alprazolam (marketed as Xanax). Rohypnol is also known as:

Circles
Forget Pill
LA Rochas
Lunch Money
Mexican Valium
Mind Erasers
Poor Man's Quaalude
R-2
Rib
Roach
Roach-2
Roches
Roofies
Roopies
Rope
Rophies
Ruffies
Trip-and-Fall
Whiteys

GHB, which is short for gamma hydroxybutyric (GAM-muh heye-DROX-ee-BYOO-tur-ihk) acid. GHB is also known as:

Bedtime Scoop
Cherry Meth
Easy Lay
Energy Drink
G
Gamma 10
Georgia Home Boy
G-Juice
Gook
Goop
Great Hormones
Grievous Bodily Harm (GBH)
Liquid E
Liquid Ecstasy
Liquid X
PM
Salt Water
Soap  
Somatomax
Vita-G

Ketamine (KEET-uh-meen), also known as:

Black Hole
Bump
Cat Valium
Green
Jet
K
K-Hole
Kit Kat
Psychedelic Heroin
Purple
Special K
Super Acid

These drugs also are known as "club drugs" because they tend to be used at dance clubs, concerts, and "raves."

The term "date rape" is widely used. But most experts prefer the term "drug-facilitated sexual assault." These drugs also are used to help people commit other crimes, like robbery and physical assault. They are used on both men and women. The term "date rape" also can be misleading because the person who commits the crime might not be dating the victim. Rather, it could be an acquaintance or stranger.

What do the drugs look like?

Rohypnol comes as a pill that dissolves in liquids. Some are small, round, and white. Newer pills are oval and green-gray in color. When slipped into a drink, a dye in these new pills makes clear liquids turn bright blue and dark drinks turn cloudy. But this color change might be hard to see in a dark drink, like cola or dark beer, or in a dark room. Also, the pills with no dye are still available. The pills may be ground up into a powder.
GHB has a few forms: a liquid with no odor or color, white powder, and pill. It might give your drink a slightly salty taste. Mixing it with a sweet drink, such as fruit juice, can mask the salty taste.
Ketamine comes as a liquid and a white powder.

What effects do these drugs have on the body?

These drugs are very powerful. They can affect you very quickly and without your knowing. The length of time that the effects last varies. It depends on how much of the drug is taken and if the drug is mixed with other drugs or alcohol. Alcohol makes the drugs even stronger and can cause serious health problems — even death.

Rohypnol

The effects of Rohypnol can be felt within 30 minutes of being drugged and can last for several hours. If you are drugged, you might look and act like someone who is drunk. You might have trouble standing. Your speech might be slurred. Or you might pass out. Rohypnol can cause these problems:

Muscle relaxation or loss of muscle control
Difficulty with motor movements
Drunk feeling
Problems talking
Nausea
Can't remember what happened while drugged
Loss of consciousness (black out)
Confusion
Problems seeing
Dizziness
Sleepiness
Lower blood pressure
Stomach problems
Death

GHB

GHB takes effect in about 15 minutes and can last 3 or 4 hours. It is very potent: A very small amount can have a big effect. So it's easy to overdose on GHB. Most GHB is made by people in home or street "labs." So, you don't know what's in it or how it will affect you. GHB can cause these problems:

Relaxation
Drowsiness
Dizziness
Nausea
Problems seeing
Loss of consciousness (black out)
Seizures
Can't remember what happened while drugged
Problems breathing
Tremors
Sweating
Vomiting
Slow heart rate
Dream-like feeling
Coma
Death

Ketamine

Ketamine is very fast-acting. You might be aware of what is happening to you, but unable to move. It also causes memory problems. Later, you might not be able to remember what happened while you were drugged. Ketamine can cause these problems:

Distorted perceptions of sight and sound
Lost sense of time and identity
Out of body experiences
Dream-like feeling
Feeling out of control
Impaired motor function
Problems breathing
Convulsions
Vomiting
Memory problems
Numbness
Loss of coordination
Aggressive or violent behavior
Depression
High blood pressure
Slurred speech

Are these drugs legal in the United States?

Some of these drugs are legal when lawfully used for medical purposes. But that doesn't mean they are safe. These drugs are powerful and can hurt you. They should only be used under a doctor's care and order.

Rohypnol is NOT legal in the United States. It is legal in Europe and Mexico, where it is prescribed for sleep problems and to assist anesthesia before surgery. It is brought into the United States illegally.
Ketamine is legal in the United States for use as an anesthetic for humans and animals. It is mostly used on animals. Veterinary clinics are robbed for their ketamine supplies.
GHB was recently made legal in the United States to treat problems from narcolepsy (a rare sleep disorder). Distribution of GHB for this purpose is tightly restricted.

Is alcohol a date rape drug? What about other drugs?

Any drug that can affect judgment and behavior can put a person at risk for unwanted or risky sexual activity. Alcohol is one such drug. In fact, alcohol is the drug most commonly used to help commit sexual assault. When a person drinks too much alcohol:

It's harder to think clearly.
It's harder to set limits and make good choices.
It's harder to tell when a situation could be dangerous.
It's harder to say "no" to sexual advances.
It's harder to fight back if a sexual assault occurs.
It's possible to blackout and to have memory loss.

The club drug "ecstasy" (MDMA) has been used to commit sexual assault. It can be slipped into someone's drink without the person's knowledge. Also, a person who willingly takes ecstasy is at greater risk of sexual assault. Ecstasy can make a person feel "lovey-dovey" towards others. It also can lower a person's ability to give reasoned consent. Once under the drug's influence, a person is less able to sense danger or to resist a sexual assault.

Even if a victim of sexual assault drank alcohol or willingly took drugs, the victim is NOT at fault for being assaulted. You cannot "ask for it" or cause it to happen.

How can I protect myself from being a victim?

Don't accept drinks from other people.
Open containers yourself.
Keep your drink with you at all times, even when you go to the bathroom.
Don't share drinks.
Don't drink from punch bowls or other common, open containers. They may already have drugs in them.
If someone offers to get you a drink from a bar or at a party, go with the person to order your drink. Watch the drink being poured and carry it yourself.
Don't drink anything that tastes or smells strange. Sometimes, GHB tastes salty.
Have a nondrinking friend with you to make sure nothing happens.
If you realize you left your drink unattended, pour it out.
If you feel drunk and haven't drunk any alcohol — or, if you feel like the effects of drinking alcohol are stronger than usual — get help right away.

Are there ways to tell if I might have been drugged and raped?

It is often hard to tell. Most victims don't remember being drugged or assaulted. The victim might not be aware of the attack until 8 or 12 hours after it occurred. These drugs also leave the body very quickly. Once a victim gets help, there might be no proof that drugs were involved in the attack. But there are some signs that you might have been drugged:

You feel drunk and haven't drunk any alcohol — or, you feel like the effects of drinking alcohol are stronger than usual.
You wake up feeling very hung over and disoriented or having no memory of a period of time.
You remember having a drink, but cannot recall anything after that.
You find that your clothes are torn or not on right.
You feel like you had sex, but you cannot remember it.

What should I do if I think I’ve been drugged and raped?

Get medical care right away. Call 911 or have a trusted friend take you to a hospital emergency room. Don't urinate, douche, bathe, brush your teeth, wash your hands, change clothes, or eat or drink before you go. These things may give evidence of the rape. The hospital will use a "rape kit" to collect evidence.
Call the police from the hospital. Tell the police exactly what you remember. Be honest about all your activities. Remember, nothing you did — including drinking alcohol or doing drugs — can justify rape.
Ask the hospital to take a urine (pee) sample that can be used to test for date rape drugs. The drugs leave your system quickly. Rohypnol stays in the body for several hours, and can be detected in the urine up to 72 hours after taking it. GHB leaves the body in 12 hours. Don't urinate before going to the hospital.
Don't pick up or clean up where you think the assault might have occurred. There could be evidence left behind — such as on a drinking glass or bed sheets.
Get counseling and treatment. Feelings of shame, guilt, fear, and shock are normal. A counselor can help you work through these emotions and begin the healing process. Calling a crisis center or a hotline is a good place to start. One national hotline is the National Sexual Assault Hotline at 1-800-656-HOPE .

For more information on date rape drugs, please call womenshealth.gov at 1-800-994-9662 or contact the following organizations:

Drug Enforcement Administration, DOJ
Phone: (202) 307-1000
Internet Address: http://www.usdoj.gov/dea

Food and Drug Administration, OPHS, HHS
Phone: (800) 332-4010 Hotline or (888) 463-6332 (Consumer Information)
Internet Address: http://www.fda.gov

National Institute on Drug Abuse, NIH, HHS
Phone: (800) 662-4357 Hotline or (800) 662-9832 Spanish Language Hotline
Internet Address: http://www.drugabuse.gov

Office of National Drug Control Policy
Phone: (800) 666-3332 (Information Clearinghouse)
Internet Address: http://www.whitehousedrugpolicy.gov/index.html

Men Can Stop Rape
Phone: (202) 265-6530
Internet Address: http://www.mencanstoprape.org

National Center for Victims of Crime
Phone: (800) 394-2255
Internet Address: http://www.ncvc.org

Rape, Abuse, and Incest National Network
Phone: (800) 656-4673 (656-HOPE)
Internet Address: http://www.rainn.org


This FAQ was reviewed by:

Susan Weiss
Chief, Science Policy Branch
National Institute on Drug Abuse


All material contained in the FAQs is free of copyright restrictions, and may be copied, reproduced, or duplicated without permission of the Office on Women's Health in the Department of Health and Human Services; citation of the source is appreciated.

​WHAT IS SEXUAL ASSAULT & RAPE

ALL INFORMATION LISTED HERE IS FROM THE OFFICE ON WOMEN'S HEALTH IN THE DEPARTMENT 0F HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES AND THE WEBSITE OF RAINN (RAPE, ABUSE & INCEST NATIONAL NETWORK) RAINN.ORG. IF YOU HAVE EXPERIENCED ANY OF THESE ACTIONS LISTED BELOW, PLEASE GET HELP! CALL 911, GO TO THE HOSPITAL, CONTACT  A PROFESSIONAL, REACH OUT TO SOMEONE YOU CAN TRUST, AND PLEASE NO YOU ARE NOT ALONE...

CALL THIS HOTLINE:

 National Sexual Assault Hotline at 800.656.HOPE(4673) 

Legal Disclaimer


UPLIFTING HEARTS MINDS & SOULS (HUMS) website provides general information that is intended, but not guaranteed, to be correct and up-to-date. The information is not presented as a source of legal advice. You should not rely, for legal advice, on statements or representations made within the website or by any externally referenced Internet sites. If you need legal advice upon which you intend to rely in the course of your legal affairs, consult a competent, independent attorney. HUMS does not assume any responsibility for actions or non-actions taken by people who have visited this site, and no one shall be entitled to a claim for detrimental reliance on any information provided or expressed.